The Girl On The Train

the-girl-on-the-train

Back in 2015 it seemed like everyone was reading Paula Hawkins The Girl on the Train and now everyone seems to be going on about the film version directed by Tate Taylor. But can the big screen adaptation be anywhere near as successful as the book?

Rachel is a lonely divorced alcholic who rides the same train everyday which passes by the house of her her ex hsuband Tom (Justin Theroux) and his new wife Anna (Rebecca Ferguson) house. She also watches another couple Scott and Megan who live on the same street (played by Luke Evans and Hayley Bennett) and daydreams about their seemingly idylic life. However when Megan goes missing Rachel becomes obsessed with finding out the truth about her disapearance, especially as she fears she may have seen Megan during a drunken blackout.

The Girl on the Train is a solid adapatation, with a great performance by Emily Blunt as the messed up Rachel. Blunt emotes sympathy for the main character while also showing us the flawed and desperate person she has become. While Blunt wasn’t who I imagined playing Rachel when the film was first announced she plays a convincing drunk who looks suitably dishevilled for most of the movie. The other central female roles are also well played by Bennett and Furguson and they are certainly more interesting roles then the ones Evans and Theroux have to play (which makes a nice change for the female to get the better roles in a film).

As I’ve read the book before this did limit my enjoyment of the mystery at the heart of the film but I was still engaged in the story. Much like the book I found the main character interesting, especially as she is such an unreliable narrator therefore you are always questioning what you are seeing and being told by her. However as the revalations gets revealed the film gets less engaging and it almost feels as though Taylor felt he had to rush through the last act to it’s so-so conclusion.

Rating 3/5 – a solid movie that isn’t quite as good as it’s leading actresses

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